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29 July 2009

Daniel introduces IMAX (Half-Blood Prince)

Daniel has a special message for North American fans regarding the 29th July IMAX release of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. This message is recorded during a press junket for the film.

28 July 2009

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince press junket interviews

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince press junket interviews including Sunrise Australia

Daniel about Bollywood





25 July 2009

Message from Daniel against piracy & interviews CNN

"Don't pirate the film! cheapo's! -Dan

That's clear and yeah we all should follow that. Click on the photo above to watch the video. Below also more press junket interviews promoting Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince from 9th July 2009. 

source: cnn.com



CNN IBN

Skip magazine interview (AT)

Austria's film magazine Skip talked with Daniel in London in promotion of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

Translation by www.danieljradcliffe.tk.

SKIP: Six Harry Potter films are out now, two are coming. But you have already extended yourself towards other things like the film The Journey is the Destination ... 
Daniel Radcliffe: Yes, that was a fantastic experience.

... and you even acted naked in the play Equus ...

Daniel Radcliffe: Exactly, a totally sexual piece, we've arrived well in New York on Broadway.

... or your memorable gig in the comedy series Extras, where you play a young talented actor named Daniel, who completely neglects to madam every woman and does not realize how penetrating he is ...
Daniel Radcliffe: Yeah, that was very funny. Harry Potter would never act like that. In addition, our new movie is very dark, and that suits me very much, I prefer to play dark roles. But I have to say, I would like to be so ingenuous and at the same time as convinced of myself as this Daniel in extras.

But how could you be an actor without knowing yourself, without any self-reflection?

Daniel Radcliffe: Well, that's the problem. You have to know yourself and be very aware of who you are so you can slip into different roles. But would not it be great if you could go through the world completely unconsciously and unreflectingly, without caring how your own appearance affects the rest of the world? Brilliant!

You've been in acting business since childhood. Does your craft feel different today? Has it become harder or easier?
Daniel Radcliffe: Much harder. I now play completely different roles than before and my own claims are much higher. I'm satisfied with what I'm doing right now. My current projects reflect exactly where I stand and I do the best and work hard on myself, but at the same time, I am fully aware that I want to go much further.

So your dream job is hard work too?

Daniel Radcliffe: Yes. Luckily, my parents gave me a strong work discipline. I think it is very important to do every job as well as possible and the harder I work, the more I can enjoy afterwards. The good thing about acting is that the lazy actors are punished with boredom. The good actors are rewarded with a kick. And not memorizing the lyrics is the hard part, but reading between the lines and working out the thoughts of the characters.

And the fame and the gossip do not bother you?

Daniel Radcliffe: There are some very funny stories about me in the press. For example, one newspaper wrote that I grew 25 centimeters in the last two months. Maybe I've grown 25 centimeters in the last five years! Another story, which is also very funny, was that I had imported extra Belgian beer from a monastery! And the best story was that I made a statue of myself and put it in my living room! Everything is not true. But I can laugh about it. Besides, the interest of the press in me is flattering, and it does not hurt me.

 Is there any part of you that will be happy when Harry Potter is over?

Daniel Radcliffe: Yes, there is. I'm really looking forward to what awaits me, what kind of roles I will play and if I can continue my development. But then there is also a part that is afraid, because all these years, even though I have made other films in between, I have returned to this role. Also, I will not see many people I like very much, which is sad.

You seem so focused and reasonable - do you have a weakness? What about girls?

Daniel Radcliffe: I like to be surrounded by women. I have always had more female friends than male friends around me, because I understand and entertain them very well. Women were always more exciting for me. I mean, I love girls. These are such great, heavenly creatures. But I do not have a girlfriend, if you want to know that. I am also a bit of a nerd and boring girl. I am not necessarily cool. Although - I have a very good taste in music.

Namely?
Daniel Radcliffe: I really like Tom Waits, The Libertines, Franz Ferdinand, I love Pete Doherty, I love guitar bands in particular. But not the kind like Slipknot or Limp Bizkit. I think that's very bad, cruel.

And what else? As an Englishman until you sure football fan ...

Daniel Radcliffe: I do not like football that much. I do not like the aggression that football can create in some people. On the one hand, the competition is great, but how some fans interact with each other and sometimes beat themselves,

source: skip.at

24 July 2009

Daniel Radcliffe's shout out to the military

Daniel has a shout out for the military, which was recorded during the press junket for Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. This video is courtesy of salutetoyourservice.com, Exchange. You can find their interview at this post.

Scans: Attitude magazine (UK)

Scans from the August 2009 issue of Attitude magazine. Features photos by Doug Inglish. Via  danradcliffe.com.
 





23 July 2009

Happy Birthday Daniel

I'd like to say Happy Birthday Daniel! I hope he will have a great day with loads of presents and being together with family and friends. And don't forget to donate to Demelza.

22 July 2009

Omelete interview: about art, music and more

Press junket interview during the promotion of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.


21 July 2009

David Heyman reveils new photo

David Heyman, the producer from the Harry Potter movies reveiled a new photo from the first day when Daniel met Rupert in 2000.

" “Here, look at this one — this is a photo taken the day the boys met. No one’s really seen this before. They were taking a little walk together to get know one another…”

They were taking a little walk together to get to know one another"

20 July 2009

Japanese fan meets Daniel

A Japanese fan visits the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows set. She won a set visit contest. A great video in which Daniel surprises her, and I love her reaction.

19 July 2009

HMV My inspiration campaign

A new photo of Daniel is being used for HMV's My Inspiration campaign to advertise the new Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince filmbox release.


picture source: Dennys Ilic

17 July 2009

Time magazine: 10 questions (Half-Blood Prince)

Daniel answers questions regarding Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince from Time magazine.

SBT Repórter's Harry Potter Behind the Magic (Half-Blood Prince)

SBT's Beto Marden takes you behind the scenes of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince in Harry Potter Behind the Magic.


Interfilms cover

Another Dennys Ilic (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince promotion) photo


Via sugarcoveredquills.org

16 July 2009

MTV Rough cut: The cast about reaching the end of Harry Potter

Rheinische Post interview

Interview by German Rheinische Post in promotion of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

Translation by www.danieljradcliffe.tk.

The fans have eagerly waited for it: Finally Harry Potter falls in love on the screen and is allowed to kiss his Ginny even extensively. Was that as exciting for you as it was for the Potter fans?
Radcliffe: No, I thought it took some getting used to, to be honest. Because I've known Bonnie Wright since she was nine, and she was always Ron's little sister - so it was a bit strange. The kiss itself was not that dramatic, I've done that a few times already. I already stood naked on stage.

When did you fall in love the first time?

Radcliffe: At the age of nine. My chosen one was Lucy and was the older sister of a friend. I sent her a card for Valentine's Day. Unfortunately, I have a succinct, not to say ugly, handwriting. That's why she knew right away that the letter was mine.

Did Lucy hear you?

Radcliffe: Never. And I suffered immensely. My parents still laugh about the story when they found me one evening in front of Lucy's house, where I sat on the steps and sang "Tomorrow, tomorrow, the Sun will come out tomorrow". I took the matter seriously.

Do wizards have the same puberty problems as other teenagers?

Radcliffe: Yeah, everything in Harry Potter's world is pretty hormonal at the moment. I find it interesting that Harry, even though he has a crush on Ginny, is above normal teenage lust. He just knows there's a big mission waiting for him, that his fate is planning something big for him. Therefore, he is more focused on this future than his feelings. But Harry's friend Ron falls in love too. When Rupert Grind had his kissing scene, of course I was on set. I did not want to miss that! I found it bizarre because I could not imagine Rupert in this situation.

Are there any unofficial rules for movie kisses?

Radcliffe: Nobody tells you that, and it's too embarrassing to ask. First of all, it is of course essential to chew lots of peppermint chewing gum. And to stay relaxed. In principle, you do everything the same way as usual. But without tongue. (Laughs)

Has the glory made it easier for you to conquer young ladies?

Radcliffe: No, fame has less influence on this topic than work: I am very busy and often on the road. This means that you may not be able to see each other as often as you like.

Do the ladies see more Harry or more Daniel in you?
Radcliffe: I think at first they see Harry Potter. But then they realize that I am more.

Can you even go to clubs without causing a mass hysteria?

Radcliffe: I do not go to clubs anyway. I hate clubs, just because of the music that's playing there. There are also tons of paparazzi. I get to know most of the girls through the work. This has the advantage that they then have more understanding that I am very busy. Where: Actually, I get to know girls everywhere. They are everywhere.

What are your future plans: Do you want to study?

Radcliffe: No, no way. You go to the university to explore what you want to do exactly after the university. I already know what I want to do in life: to act and write. And I also get to know people from all over the world. Everything the university can offer me, I get in the film business.

Which colleagues have become friends over time?

Radcliffe: Gary Oldman. That will not change, he's just my biggest idol. If, as an actor, I ever get close to what he commands, I'm the happiest man in the world. Otherwise, there are so many incredibly nice people in the team, there's nobody with whom I do not want to stay in touch.

Do you already think of how your last Harry Potter shooting day will be?

Radcliffe: I will have mixed feelings. I love these movies, I learned everything I know about acting here. My self-confidence is thanks to Harry Potter. I have been working on these films almost every day for the past few years, my colleagues have become my family. The costume designer became my best friend, the make-up artists are mother figures - even if my mother will always be my mother. But we'll never be more together than unity, that's heartbreaking. On the other hand, I am looking forward to choosing between new projects soon.

What would you like to remember?

Radcliffe: It'll be unbearably nostalgic when I watch the movies. Maybe it will be easier if I have children myself. I really want to become a father. I think that would be cool, to look at everything with them and to say: "Look what daddy is doing!"

source: rp-online.de

Daniel Radcliffe on Heart FM Showbiz

There is a new exclusive interview from Heart Showbiz (106.2 FM) available on iTunes in which Daniel answers fan questions about Harry Potter, going commando, comfort food, doing karaoke, extreme fans, his premiere fear, and the new Harry Potter Theme Park in Orlando. Listen to it below or download it via the iTunes podcast link.



source: heart.co.uk

Channel 9's Harry Potter Behind the Magic (Half-Blood Prince)

Australia Channel 9's Richard Wilkins takes you behind the scenes in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Behind the Magic.

There's only a video from part 2

Rotten Tomatoes interview

Rotten Tomatoes sat down with Daniel on the set of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

In the last movie Harry seemed to face psychological and physical challenges, whereas in this movie the problems he faces are more intellectual, as he tries to piece the puzzle together. Does anything change in your approach to the character?
Daniel Radcliffe: I don’t think a huge amount does change in terms of how you approach it. You come to every scene with the same basic tools. You come to it with knowledge of your character and knowledge of what their fundamental wants and needs are and how they would go about getting them. And you would just apply them to whatever situation they’re in. The real challenge of acting for me, I suppose, is just getting to know a character very, very well and just applying what I know about them to every single scene. That’s what it can be broken down to.

In the case of Harry in this film, his want – or his need – is basically to kill Voldemort and he realises that the way in which he’ll do this is to become Dumbledore’s favourite foot soldier. That’s the role you see him gradually moving toward in this film. He’s preparing for the battle to come.
DR: Yeah, absolutely, he’s preparing for the seventh [and eighth] film.

Has anything changed, for you, between the way David Yates has approached Order of the Phoenix and the way he’s approaching Half-Blood Prince?

DR: I think David’s a lot more confident this time around. He was brilliant on Order of the Phoenix, I think he did an amazing job, but the way he is on set now, I think he feels a lot more comfortable here. And that’s understandable because it is quite an intimidating environment to come into when a lot of us have been here for seven years. I think he’s been a lot more confident this time around.

Harry doesn’t really suffer Slughorn too gladly and yet I can imagine working with someone like Jim Broadbent is nothing but a pleasure – how has that been?
DR: Working with Jim is amazing just because he’s such a brilliant actor and he’s so immersed in the character which is always a treat to see. But, in a way, because he is so in character it kind-of makes it easier to act the way Harry does around him.

But I think Harry ultimately does like Slughorn. I think he thinks he’s a very good person and his heart is in the right place but he’s just very opportunistic and totally self-obsessed. I think Harry, in a strange way, finds that endearing and in an even stranger way perhaps actually likes the fact that Slughorn is fascinated by the aura of fame and glory that he sees surrounding Harry. And Harry also finds it, obviously, very useful in the film, because he has to exploit it.

How did you enjoy shooting the cave scenes with Michael Gambon?

DR: The brilliant thing about [that sequence] was that we did it at the end of a three to four month period where Michael and I had been working together almost exclusively. For about the first two or three months of this film we were almost the only two actors in. We did a few scenes with Rupert and a few scenes with Jim but other than that it was few and far between that you’d ever see any other cast members on set. The relationship between me and Michael really built up over that time and got to the point where after three or four months we were absolutely ready to do the cave stuff.

It’s almost like a play to be working so constantly with so few other actors.

DR: Totally. I didn’t think of it that way at the time, but there was that kind of dynamic where you get to know someone very, very well in a short space of time and your relationship becomes based on certain things. I think mine and Michael’s relationship is very much based on our senses of humour. We’ve got very similar senses of humour and I think when you know that you’re both going to have to work together very closely doing very difficult stuff over the next few months you really need to very, very quickly find something that you can sort-of bond over. I’ve worked with Michael a lot over the last few films but more so in this one – by a long, long way – than I ever had before. It was great stuff.

Has it changed the relationship you have with him?
DR: I think so; I think we’ve got a lot closer. I didn’t really know him very well before. And I wouldn’t say I know him well now, but I certainly know him a lot better and I think I now understand the way he works more. I certainly think we’ve become much closer through it.

What was your reaction to hearing that Dumbledore had been outed?

DR: I thought it was hilarious, but what was even funnier about it was the reaction from people who were up in arms about it. I don’t think it really matters. He’s [J.K. Rowling‘s] character and she can do what she likes with him.

I think Michael thought it was really funny. He was really camping it up around set for a couple of weeks after that! I thought it was great.

How would you compare the romantic scenes you have with Ginny to shooting the stuff with Cho on the last movie?
DR: The thing is that when Katie [Leung, who plays Cho] came into the cast we knew she was playing the love interest whereas with Bonnie [Wright, who plays Ginny] was just brought in to play Ginny. It’s very odd because I’ve known Bonnie since she was about nine. It’s quite strange, really.

Did it take you by surprise that they’d hook up when you read Half-Blood Prince?

DR: No, I thought it was quite fitting, really. I was quite glad of it, I suppose. It seems right.

Had you been privy to information from J.K. Rowling about the course the series would take?

DR: Not that much. Only to the extent that I had dinner with her one night almost a year ago and I said to her that I’d love to know what happens to Harry. Or, at least, what he state he ended up in. I think my exact words were probably as tactless and unsubtle as, “Do I die?” She said, “You have a death scene.” So it was very obvious that it didn’t mean, “Yes, you die.”

And you had to keep that to yourself?

DR: Yes I did.

Was that difficult?
DR: No, it was really great fun! I’d say, “I know something,” and everyone would go, “What, what?!” I’d just go, “I’m not going to tell you!” I quite enjoyed that to be honest. For months and months in interviews before – because we did the press junket for the fifth film just before the seventh book came out – to endless television journalists I was just lying and saying, “No, no, I know nothing…” [laughs] Then when I did the interviews for My Boy Jack, which I did after the book came out, they were saying, “So, did you know anything?” I could say, “Yes, I knew all along, HA HA HA!” I enjoyed that, definitely, but it wasn’t as hard to keep it quiet as people might think.

Did your theory change before that? For the longest time you’d said you thought he was going to die and then you changed your mind and said you thought he wasn’t…

DR: It was partly because suddenly it seemed too obvious that he was going to die. That came before I spoke to her because I was having a conversation with David Heyman [one of the film’s producers] and I was saying I thought he’d die. David actually talked me around and said he thought that it’d be too obvious for Harry to get killed. That’s when I came to the conclusion that I could speculate as much as I liked but in the end she was going to come up with something much cleverer than I could even dream of.

Did anyone know about Dumbledore’s death before the book came out?

DR: Not that I know of. No-one had any knowledge of Sirius’ death either. I, in fact, told Gary Oldman, I believe. No-one had any knowledge of Dumbledore’s I think. The only person who was privy to any amount of information before was Alan Rickman. I don’t know what, exactly, he knew, but I’m sure he knew something.

I’m sure I remember Robbie Coltrane boasting about knowing something before the book for Order of the Phoenix came out.
DR: I’m fairly certain he was just throwing you a red herring; that’d be a very Robbie thing to do!

You’ve mentioned in the past that you want to direct. Did you ever have a desire to direct a Harry Potter film?

DR: Oh God no, not at all. Never, never, never; absolutely not. I don’t want to direct until I’ve learnt a lot more than I know now and if I ever do I think I’d like to start with something less ambitious. Short films rather than this big $280m – or whatever budget these things have – movie. I don’t think that’d be a good place to start!

You’ve worked with four fantastic directors on the Potter films, each of them with their own styles and ways of working, so you must’ve learnt quite a bit over the years.

DR: I’ve learnt a lot about certain things but you also learn through your own experience. I love working with David and I love his style of direction because I love the way he works with actors. There may be actors out there who wouldn’t like that same style. I’d say the thing I’ve learnt most of all from watching these directors is how to direct actors. But at the same time I’ve learnt how I like to be directed and that’s the only thing that can influence how I can direct anyone else. 


In terms of the technical side of things I’m still pretty clueless. I know a certain amount and I can see a certain amount of what’s going on but technically speaking I really don’t know. But then I said that once, and it’d have been either to David or Mike Newell, and he said, “Oh, don’t worry about that, you just need a good D.O.P.!” So I thought that was quite a good piece of advice! But, certainly, I’ve been fortunate enough to work with four amazing directors, so I’ve been very, very lucky.

Well, not just four…
DR: Absolutely, Brian Kirk, Simon Curtis, Thea Sharrock… John Boorman on The Tailor of Panama, who’s a very good director but did then say that my life would be ruined so I hold that against him a little bit!

What are you most looking forward to doing in Deathly Hallows?

DR: I think it has got to be the walk into the forest to find Voldemort. And, also, the King’s Cross chapter. I’m looking forward to doing all of that. It’s weird because those scenes always seem to be the ones you shoot about two weeks into filming. Which is great because you get them over with and you’re not worrying about them, but it’s the difference between getting a book and going straight to the back and going, “OK, fine,” and getting a book, reading it through, and being moved by it. In my dream, idealised world, we’d do that scene on the last day of filming and I’d get very, very emotional and it’d just be great. But that won’t happen. It never happens that way!

Generally, all the on-the-road stuff will be great, because we very, very rarely go on location with these films. It’ll be lovely to get out of the studios.

Very little Hogwarts, too…
DR: Very little, so I’ve no idea what’s going to happen to the sets. They’re going to keep them, but we’re going to have to knock some down…

What do you think Harry’s greatest weaknesses are?

DR: I think he’s quite reluctant to listen to other people sometimes. Some might say he’s overly opinionated. I think he can make a martyr of himself sometimes; I think he likes the suffering, lonely hero mystique. Sometimes I think he revels in that. Not always by any stretch of the imagination; I think 90% of the time he’s absolutely genuine, but I think 10% of the time he slightly revels in it a bit too much.

What’s the best bit of advice you’ve had during filming?

DR: I was talking to someone recently, funnily enough, and they said an interesting thing about acting. Acting is really instinctual and I think you can overanalyse what you’re doing. A lot of it has to be based on instinct. Someone said something really interesting which is that you should never move or feel you have to change your expression just because you haven’t changed your face for a while. Wait for that just to happen and almost try not to be in control of it because then you’ll be in control of it in the moment. I’m explaining it really badly but basically it’s about waiting for the impulse to come to you rather than forcing it to come.

You’ve been on these films for a long time now. Is there still a sense of excitement or does it dull?
DR: I’m here doing a job that I love and I get to see some of my best friends every day at work. I’m incredibly lucky and I do still get excited to come to work and I still do get wowed by some of the sets that I see. When I walked onto the cave set, obviously some of it is green screen but of what’s actually there, it’s amazing. You’re still very wide-eyed and overawed by it, definitely.

source: rottentomatoes.com

One Day in the Life of Daniel Radcliffe by Tim Hailand

Photographer Tim Hailand has released the first in an ongoing series of "One Day in the Life of" books. Each book will give an intimate glimpse into the day to day lives of well known figures from the arts and entertainment industry, as well as public figures. First in the series details One Day in the Life of Daniel Radcliffe, captured on January 13th 2009 during the actor's Broadway run of EQUUS. Comprised of 50 images, captured during Radcliffe's first experience of working in New York and on Broadway.

Hailand hopes with this book to give the viewer greater insight into Radcliffe as a person as well as a creative and reflective thinker. The footnotes for the book have been written by the young actor giving a personal perspective of each image and its relevance in that day. Hailand will donate a portion of all book sales to Broadway Cares/Equity fights AIDS, in recognition of this great organization.

Release dates: US 15th December and UK 21th December. For more info: The official Website (buy the book): onedayinthelifeof.org Tim Hailand: timhailand.com






picture source: Tim Hailand

15 July 2009

USA Today interview

The trio talked with USA Today about Harry Potter and more, and here is Daniel's part.

"Hopefully in the next couple of years, I'll be back on stage in some form. I'd love to come to Broadway again," Radcliffe says. "They responded to the fact that I have a work ethic. I was on Broadway at the same time as Jeremy Piven, and I think he made me look really, really good because I didn't miss a show." He was jokingly referring to Piven's run in Speed-the-Plow, which was shortened by the actor's mercury poisoning.
David Yates, who directed Half-Blood Prince and will direct the upcoming Deathly Hallows movies, has lunch every week with Radcliffe. "Dan is maturing. He's got this natural leadership skill. I wouldn't be surprised if he became a director."
Once the final Potter wraps, Radcliffe is scheduled to play British photojournalist Dan Eldon, who was killed in 1993 in Mogadishu, Somalia. "I really want to do that. It's just a matter of getting the script absolutely right," Radcliffe says.
First thing he'll do after Potter? "Sleep. Ideally, I would have three weeks off and go straight to something else. I get bored not working. … I have a huge amount of energy. When I'm on set, I use it all up. At home, I go wild in my head."
source: usatoday.com
picture source: Robert Deutsch

Daniel Radcliffe on BBC Radio 1's The Chris Moyles Show

The Audio from BBC Radio 1 The Chris Moyles Show interview with Daniel where they mainly talked about Harry Potter.



BBC Radio 1 on the Deathly Hallows set

Edith Bowman from BBC Radio 1 could walk around on the Harry Potter set today. They did meet Daniel but he did hide on the photo below because he was wearing the "swollen face" prosthetics.


sourc: bbc.co.uk

IGN interview

IGN interview in promotion of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

In the last movie Harry seemed to face psychological and physical challenges, whereas in this movie the problems he faces are more intellectual, as he tries to piece the puzzle together. Does anything change in your approach to the character?
Daniel Radcliffe: I don't think a huge amount does change in terms of how you approach it. You come to every scene with the same basic tools. You come to it with knowledge of your character and knowledge of what their fundamental wants and needs are and how they would go about getting them. And you would just apply them to whatever situation they're in. The real challenge of acting for me, I suppose, is just getting to know a character very, very well and just applying what I know about them to every single scene. That's what it can be broken down to.

In the case of Harry in this film, his want - or his need - is basically to kill Voldemort and he realises that the way in which he'll do this is to become Dumbledore's favourite foot soldier. That's the role you see him gradually moving toward in this film.

He's preparing for the battle to come.
DR: Yeah, absolutely, he's preparing for the seventh [and eighth] film.

Has anything changed, for you, between the way David Yates has approached Order of the Phoenix and the way he's approaching Half-Blood Prince?
DR: I think David's a lot more confident this time around. He was brilliant on Order of the Phoenix, I think he did an amazing job, but the way he is on set now, I think he feels a lot more comfortable here. And that's understandable because it is quite an intimidating environment to come into when a lot of us have been here for seven years. I think he's been a lot more confident this time around.

Harry doesn't really suffer Slughorn too gladly and yet I can imagine working with someone like Jim Broadbent is nothing but a pleasure - how has that been?
DR: Working with Jim is amazing just because he's such a brilliant actor and he's so immersed in the character which is always a treat to see. But, in a way, because he is so in character it kind-of makes it easier to act the way Harry does around him.

But I think Harry ultimately does like Slughorn. I think he thinks he's a very good person and his heart is in the right place but he's just very opportunistic and totally self-obsessed. I think Harry, in a strange way, finds that endearing and in an even stranger way perhaps actually likes the fact that Slughorn is fascinated by the aura of fame and glory that he sees surrounding Harry. And Harry also finds it, obviously, very useful in the film, because he has to exploit it.

How did you enjoy shooting the cave scenes with Michael Gambon?
DR: The brilliant thing about [that sequence] was that we did it at the end of a three to four month period where Michael and I had been working together almost exclusively. For about the first two or three months of this film we were almost the only two actors in. We did a few scenes with Rupert and a few scenes with Jim but other than that it was few and far between that you'd ever see any other cast members on set. The relationship between me and Michael really built up over that time and got to the point where after three or four months we were absolutely ready to do the cave stuff.
It's almost like a play to be working so constantly with so few other actors.
DR: Totally. I didn't think of it that way at the time, but there was that kind of dynamic where you get to know someone very, very well in a short space of time and your relationship becomes based on certain things. I think mine and Michael's relationship is very much based on our senses of humour. We've got very similar senses of humour and I think when you know that you're both going to have to work together very closely doing very difficult stuff over the next few months you really need to very, very quickly find something that you can sort-of bond over. I've worked with Michael a lot over the last few films but more so in this one - by a long, long way - than I ever had before. It was great stuff.

Has it changed the relationship you have with him?
DR: I think so; I think we've got a lot closer. I didn't really know him very well before. And I wouldn't say I know him well now, but I certainly know him a lot better and I think I now understand the way he works more. I certainly think we've become much closer through it.

What was your reaction to hearing that Dumbledore had been outed?
DR: I thought it was hilarious, but what was even funnier about it was the reaction from people who were up in arms about it. I don't think it really matters. He's [J.K. Rowling's] character and she can do what she likes with him.
I think Michael thought it was really funny. He was really camping it up around set for a couple of weeks after that! I thought it was great.

How would you compare the romantic scenes you have with Ginny to shooting the stuff with Cho on the last movie?
DR: The thing is that when Katie [Leung, who plays Cho] came into the cast we knew she was playing the love interest whereas with Bonnie [Wright, who plays Ginny] was just brought in to play Ginny. It's very odd because I've known Bonnie since she was about nine. It's quite strange, really.

Did it take you by surprise that they'd hook up when you read Half-Blood Prince?
DR: No, I thought it was quite fitting, really. I was quite glad of it, I suppose. It seems right.

Had you been privy to information from J.K. Rowling about the course the series would take?
DR: Not that much. Only to the extent that I had dinner with her one night almost a year ago and I said to her that I'd love to know what happens to Harry. Or, at least, what he state he ended up in. I think my exact words were probably as tactless and unsubtle as, "Do I die?" She said, "You have a death scene." So it was very obvious that it didn't mean, "Yes, you die."

And you had to keep that to yourself? DR: Yes I did.
Was that difficult?
DR: No, it was really great fun! I'd say, "I know something," and everyone would go, "What, what?!" I'd just go, "I'm not going to tell you!" I quite enjoyed that to be honest. For months and months in interviews before - because we did the press junket for the fifth film just before the seventh book came out - to endless television journalists I was just lying and saying, "No, no, I know nothing..." [laughs] Then when I did the interviews for My Boy Jack, which I did after the book came out, they were saying, "So, did you know anything?" I could say, "Yes, I knew all along, HA HA HA!" I enjoyed that, definitely, but it wasn't as hard to keep it quiet as people might think.

Did your theory change before that? For the longest time you'd said you thought he was going to die and then you changed your mind and said you thought he wasn't...
DR: It was partly because suddenly it seemed too obvious that he was going to die. That came before I spoke to her because I was having a conversation with David Heyman [one of the film's producers] and I was saying I thought he'd die. David actually talked me around and said he thought that it'd be too obvious for Harry to get killed. That's when I came to the conclusion that I could speculate as much as I liked but in the end she was going to come up with something much cleverer than I could even dream of.

Did anyone know about Dumbledore's death before the book came out?
DR: Not that I know of. No-one had any knowledge of Sirius' death either. I, in fact, told Gary Oldman, I believe. No-one had any knowledge of Dumbledore's I think. The only person who was privy to any amount of information before was Alan Rickman. I don't know what, exactly, he knew, but I'm sure he knew something.

I'm sure I remember Robbie Coltrane boasting about knowing something before the book for Order of the Phoenix came out.
DR: I'm fairly certain he was just throwing you a red herring; that'd be a very Robbie thing to do!

You've mentioned in the past that you want to direct. Did you ever have a desire to direct a Harry Potter film?
DR: Oh God no, not at all. Never, never, never; absolutely not. I don't want to direct until I've learnt a lot more than I know now and if I ever do I think I'd like to start with something less ambitious. Short films rather than this big $280m - or whatever budget these things have - movie. I don't think that'd be a good place to start!

You've worked with four fantastic directors on the Potter films, each of them with their own styles and ways of working, so you must've learnt quite a bit over the years.
DR: I've learnt a lot about certain things but you also learn through your own experience. I love working with David and I love his style of direction because I love the way he works with actors. There may be actors out there who wouldn't like that same style. I'd say the thing I've learnt most of all from watching these directors is how to direct actors. But at the same time I've learnt how I like to be directed and that's the only thing that can influence how I can direct anyone else.

In terms of the technical side of things I'm still pretty clueless. I know a certain amount and I can see a certain amount of what's going on but technically speaking I really don't know. But then I said that once, and it'd have been either to David or Mike Newell, and he said, "Oh, don't worry about that, you just need a good D.O.P.!" So I thought that was quite a good piece of advice!
But, certainly, I've been fortunate enough to work with four amazing directors, so I've been very, very lucky.

Well, not just four...
DR: Absolutely, Brian Kirk, Simon Curtis, Thea Sharrock... John Boorman on The Tailor of Panama, who's a very good director but did then say that my life would be ruined so I hold that against him a little bit!
What are you most looking forward to doing in Deathly Hallows?
DR: I think it has got to be the walk into the forest to find Voldemort. And, also, the King's Cross chapter. I'm looking forward to doing all of that. It's weird because those scenes always seem to be the ones you shoot about two weeks into filming. Which is great because you get them over with and you're not worrying about them, but it's the difference between getting a book and going straight to the back and going, "OK, fine," and getting a book, reading it through, and being moved by it. In my dream, idealised world, we'd do that scene on the last day of filming and I'd get very, very emotional and it'd just be great. But that won't happen. It never happens that way!
Generally, all the on-the-road stuff will be great, because we very, very rarely go on location with these films. It'll be lovely to get out of the studios.

Very little Hogwarts, too...
DR: Very little, so I've no idea what's going to happen to the sets. They're going to keep them, but we're going to have to knock some down...

What do you think Harry's greatest weaknesses are?
DR: I think he's quite reluctant to listen to other people sometimes. Some might say he's overly opinionated. I think he can make a martyr of himself sometimes; I think he likes the suffering, lonely hero mystique. Sometimes I think he revels in that. Not always by any stretch of the imagination; I think 90% of the time he's absolutely genuine, but I think 10% of the time he slightly revels in it a bit too much.

What's the best bit of advice you've had during filming?
DR: I was talking to someone recently, funnily enough, and they said an interesting thing about acting. Acting is really instinctual and I think you can overanalyse what you're doing. A lot of it has to be based on instinct. Someone said something really interesting which is that you should never move or feel you have to change your expression just because you haven't changed your face for a while. Wait for that just to happen and almost try not to be in control of it because then you'll be in control of it in the moment. I'm explaining it really badly but basically it's about waiting for the impulse to come to you rather than forcing it to come.

You've been on these films for a long time now. Is there still a sense of excitement or does it dull?
DR: I'm here doing a job that I love and I get to see some of my best friends every day at work. I'm incredibly lucky and I do still get excited to come to work and I still do get wowed by some of the sets that I see. When I walked onto the cave set, obviously some of it is green screen but of what's actually there, it's amazing. You're still very wide-eyed and overawed by it, definitely.

source: ign.com

Updated: Time Out magazine photoshoot (US)

Photos from the photoshoot for Time Out magazine.



Update:
Outtakes via Daniel Radcliffe Network

















source: timeout.com
picture source: Phil Fisk