27 March 2012

Focus Online interview

German website Focus Online interviewed Daniel in Munich (München) in promotion of The Woman in Black (Die Frau in Schwarz).

Translation by www.danieljradcliffe.tk.

Focus Online: Mr. Radcliffe, do you believe in ghosts?
Daniel Radcliffe: No, not at all, never before.
I know that makes people very disappointed.

Why did you decide after Harry Potter only for a movie in which you open again creaky doors and find scary things behind it?
Radcliffe: Well, that's true for many movies.
To anyone who works with tension. I do not think "The Woman in Black" bears any resemblance to Harry Potter. The current movie is much darker and not a children's film. I would not advise anyone to include a kid under twelve in the movie. There is no blood or extreme violence, but he is afraid. In my opinion, the children in hindsight affects more.

The last "Harry Potter" movies have been annoyed, but children are really scared.
Radcliffe: Interestingly, the children always said in the Harry Potter test screenings: No, he was not scary.
The parents were horrified. They were really scared.


What criteria did you choose the first movie after Potter?
Radcliffe: Among the books I was offered, it was the only one that could make a compelling film for me.
It was very demanding. Although it contained few dialogues and many scene instructions, I suddenly read it like a good novel. Harry is very similar to me because I played him at the age of ten. He had my energy and my way of doing things. Arthur, on the other hand, has suffered a terrible loss. He is completely lost, uninvolved in his own life. He was deprived of all energy. So he is an anti-Harry.

Do you think that pulls you from the Potter audience?
Radcliffe: I was scared that the viewers in me would see Harry Potter.
But the fact that I'm not wearing glasses and I'm dressed differently prevents that. Believe me. At least, I hope so. The subject is also very different. It's about loss, sadness and not being able to look ahead.

If you do not believe in ghosts, what are you worried about?
Radcliffe: In fact, sometimes I'm afraid of the dark when something moves somewhere. Otherwise, I'm more scared on another level, for example, from failing. And in front of Ryan.

Who is Ryan?

Radcliffe: Ryan has doubled me since the fourth Potter movie. He found it damn funny to hide somewhere in the scenery during rehearsals for "The Woman in Black" and then jump out and scare me. I got angry and there was a competition between us. He won it because he managed to hide in the footwell of the passenger seat in my car. When I drove home in the evening after the shoot, he jumped out. So, to answer your question: Someone who looks like me and scares me: that scares me.

How do you put on a frightened face for 20 minutes if the movie is not something that scares you?
Radcliffe: A good backdrop helps. The space escape in the scene you refer to radiated the feeling that you could lose yourself in it. Still, it was not easy because for four consecutive days we shot this long scene where nothing is said. At the end of the third day, I no longer knew what I was doing, whether I always put on the same face. I have relied on the opinion of the director. This stupid scene is, in my opinion, the most convincing in the movie, but honestly it was not the biggest challenge for me.

What then?

Radcliffe: It was hard for me to suppress my energy. Arthur was deprived of his energy and I had to go through this with myself. Physically, the scene was not completely without at the end.


Was this scene where you throw a body out of the smacking mud in the middle of the night, as disgusting as the movie looks?
Radcliffe: Um, well, to be honest. That's what it looked like. However for two days. There are not many jobs where you dig in the mud to make a living.

"The Woman in Black" is not only scary, but also romantic. How do you deal with the romance?

Radcliffe: I find this dark, yearning romance very well suited for the cinema. This has a tragic beauty. There's a lot of cinematic nostalgia in the movie, it reminds me of old Dracula movies that I really like.

So you send your girlfriend, then black roses?

Radcliffe: Exactly. In my house it always looks like a funeral. (Grins)

In your current movie, you play the father of a child. Did you grow up?
Radcliffe: The time on the theater stage helped me a lot. That made me grow as an actor, I hope. But I did not consciously try to grow up somehow. I find it embarrassing when people get older. I just wanted to portray the character of Arthur and, of course, the relationship with the child.

How is it in real life?

Radcliffe: I'm sure I got older, but I do not feel really grown-up. Although playing has already left it's mark.

To what extent?

Radcliffe: I'm getting better as an actor and I know better what makes me happy. I was pretty worried about my career development. That has gotten better.

Would you like to play on Broadway again?
Radcliffe: Definitely!
I would like to attend a world premiere. No matter how good a production is, if it's not about Shakespeare, people will always compare the piece to the original. When you buy a piece, the first pages always show who it was. It would be my absolute dream to be able to read my name there one day.

Good actor, good movies, good musicals. Are you the next Hugh Jackman?
Radcliffe: Oha!
I would have to lie if I said I did not want to be like him. But I'm also happy when I'm close to being so good.

Have you ever met him?
Radcliffe: Yes, I met him a few times in the West Village in London when he walked with his French Bulldog.
Recently we met while jogging and spoke briefly. I thought it must look strange to people: Harry Potter and Wolverine talking.


Would you like to James Bond or Doctor
Who will play and follow in the footsteps of two great British actors?

Radcliffe: I'm not a big fan of Doctor Who. Above all, I want to play the current Bond, because Sam Mendes is the director. But the break would be too big. It would have to come first, a whole series of Bond films in which 007 each time a little smaller and slimmer. If I followed Daniel Craig, people would laugh at me.


source: focus.de

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