20 April 2016

Papel magazine interview

Interview from El Mundo's Papel magazine (Spanish) from their London correspondent.

Translation (via Google translate, edited by me).

Igor's character leads us inevitably to Marty Feldman in Young Frankenstein. What differentiates you and what is it?
He was also short, but certainly much more fun ... My Igor is, so to speak, more physical, marked by the stigma of the hump, and is certainly a more contentious relationship with Victor Frankenstein. It's not his lapdog, nor his faithful servant. He is a person who is torn between loyalty and fear of this dangerous inventor, who has an ego.

The film is quite different from the novel by Mary Shelley ...
Starting with the character Igor isn't even in the book ... so it's true. I'd say we're not even to a horror movie. There are tributes to all previous Frankenstein films, but this is rather a mix of psychological thriller and adventure film. Everything revolves around the very peculiar relationship between Igor and Victor (James McAvoy). In fact, the monster does not leave almost nothing to the end, I do not know if we should say ...

And since you said that what are your own monsters, if you have them?

 I would say that's insecurity, which is a very common monster in our profession. In the background, the actors and actresses are a bit masochistic: we like to suffer and constantly test ourselves. And the harder the challenge, the more strengthened salts. That is the ultimate gratification that gives this profession, regardless of what the critics say. Personally, I always look for roles out of my comfort zone.

But it is easy to fall into the 'trap' franchise ... Weren't you not afraid of being the eternal Harry Potter?
Not at all. I am conscious that I was working much of my childhood, but the magic was always there: going back to filming was like a big family reunion. I would even say that helped me see life from other angles. And it served to get vaccinated against the franchises. I've already done it once; I do not need it anymore. But it is common knowledge that in the last installment of the series (2011) went through a difficult time.

You have recognized that you had problems with alcohol.
 All transitions are complicated, and that it especially was. But in life we ​​sooner or later have these periods of confusion and uncertainty. They are needed to mature ... and in my 26 years I sometimes get the impression I have not yet matured enough. I prefer not to talk much about that time, I said everything I had to say I drank more of the account, I spent entire days locked up, I became a recluse at 20 years old ... But I was not, I was a shadow of myself. I consider myself an enthusiastic and fun person, I think that part of my childhood is still very much alive.

Harry Potter Igor, to Allen Ginsberg in Kill Your Darlings and Ig in Horns, do you intend to constantly mislead or do you like change?
I think what we as actors really like is look in the mirror and not recognize ourselves, (laughs). Portraying a young Allen Ginsberg was also a challenge and a reward; is one of my favorite poets ... I like the variety, it is true, but I have not an idea about where I want to go or not in my career plan.

And the theater? you debuted at 17 years in Equus to critical acclaim an audience.
 That is perhaps the only guide that I follow: stepping on a stage every two or three years. Equus gave me great confidence. I enjoyed Broadway with How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and more recently I have returned with The Cripple of Inishmaan. It's something we have in common all British actors, and also New York: you have to prove yourself in front of an audience.

And that would not be possible if you lived in Hollywood ...
That is another world. I admit that it may be attractive to players, but not my world. I live between New York and London because you're there more down on the floor.

What is the secret to escape the harassment of the British tabloids?
 I limit myself to work and going out with my friends. Point. For a while I chased and keep asking me all the time for my girlfriend (Erin Darke). But I try not to make a show of my private life.

What is the law of life?
I like to live in the moment and not make too many plans. And when I'm in doubt I always do the test of happiness. I wonder: 'Will this project make me happy or not?'. Sometimes happiness springs from the most unexpected places. For example, in Tokyo Vice (based on the autobiography of American journalist Jake Aldelstein) I had to learn me up to 50 phrases in Japanese. That requires a lot of effort, but in the end gives you great satisfaction.

Regarding the myth of Frankenstein, we are not approaching that point where science has gone too far?
That question we have been doing for more than a century, and is one of the reasons why the myth is still alive. The promise of science is still alive, but fears that something might go wrong are greater. Nuclear technology, cloning, artificial intelligence ... Stephen Hawking himself has recently warned: we have to be very careful with the use of technology. For now here we are, hopefully we live long.

source: elmundo.es/papel

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