01 July 2016

The Daily Telegraph interview (UK)

A new interview from The Daily Telegraph (Telegraph magazine) and features a few new photos too. He talks about Now You See Me 2, Swiss Army Man and more while he was preparing for his role in Jungle.

See a larger version of the second photo on Facebook.

When Daniel Radcliffe first walks in I can’t believe how terrible he looks: sallow-faced, dark smudges under his eyes, long beard. And so thin. At least a stone lighter than when we met four years ago. And he wasn’t remotely big then.  It quickly becomes obvious that he’s starving himself.
He tells me he is subsisting on a daily diet of one chicken breast and a protein bar, boosted by coffee and cigarettes. Radcliffe has been getting into character for his role in Jungle, a film adapted from a true story, where he plays Yossi Ghinsberg, a young adventurer who gets lost in the Bolivian jungle.
He has a few more ‘skinny scenes’ to shoot and then plans to celebrate with a chocolate bar.
About Erin Darke:
‘People always say, “How does it feel to have grown up on screen?”  And my answer has always been, I didn’t. Yes, I grew up on film sets, but my first kiss, my  first girlfriend – that all happened very privately off camera. But that scene with Erin where we meet is genuinely a really lovely recording of us flirting with each other, us  falling in love.’
About Jesse Eisenberg and Now You See Me 2:
‘We’re probably on a lot of the same lists, because we are quite similar in some ways, both up for nerdy leading-man roles. So it was fun to be on set with him.’

‘This is going to sound really bad but it’s great doing a film where you have no responsibility to be the emotional centre.’

‘Walter is easily the best-dressed character I’ve ever played. He has an amazing collection of slippers and loafers, like ones in blue velvet with skulls on. And what’s great is they actually exist. Some company makes these rich, dickhead loafers. Who would actually go around wearing them? But they are so fantastic for character.’

The film also shows Radcliffe’s skill at flicking playing cards from one hand to the other. He was taught by Andrei Jikh, who specialises in ‘cardistry’. ‘It took 20 seconds to teach me and then about three weeks of doing it,’ Radcliffe recalls. And when he says doing it, you can bet he tried it again and again, driving his friends mad.
About Swiss Army Man:
‘I think it’s extraordinary, strangely beautiful,’ he says, ‘one of the best films I’ve ever done, ever been in.’
The long road to sobriety (he isn't drinking anymore)
‘I can’t tell you what kind of drunk I am because I don’t remember what kind of drunk I am. I think I’m probably great – while I’m conscious. But then I have to be looked after and ultimately I don’t want to wake up to 20 text messages along the lines of, ‘Where are you? Dude, are you OK?’
‘I change when I’m drunk. I’m one of those people who changes.’ He goes on, ‘There is something in any person who drinks in a way that’s clearly not good for them, something that is attracted to that chaos.’

I ask how he alters his state of consciousness now. ‘You can’t really,’ he replies. ‘I mean I read. I was a really voracious reader in my teens and that was one of the things I found drinking took away from me, bizarrely, as a side effect. I didn’t have the compulsion or energy to read anything. So I’ve got that back.’

He used to take ‘epic five-hour walks’ whenever he felt the urge to drink, ‘but then I found you just roll around in your head’. So now he works out in the gym and goes running. ‘Like the cliché of anybody who is quitting something, I really got into exercise,’ he says.

‘In fact these are the first two days I haven’t trained twice a day for the last two weeks, so I’m slightly having a moment of, oh man’ – he slaps his thighs. ‘It’s all going to shit already!’ 
Harry Potter, to a point, will always define me,’ he says, ‘but I hope in the same way that Harrison Ford is defined by Star Wars.’
source: telegraph.co.uk
picture source: Amanda Friedman